Book Review: My First Touch and Feel Seasons by Xavier Deneux

seasons-book

  • Board Book
  • Ages: 0-3
  • My First Touch and Feel Seasons, Deneux. Twirl/Tourbillon, 2016.

WHAT I LOVE ABOUT THIS BOOK

  • Bright Colors
  • Simple Illustrations
  • Unique and Rich Vocabulary
  • Tactile Learning
  • Sparks Conversation
  • Builds Reading Comprehension

Infants and toddlers explore the world through touch. They love to put toys, books and anything they find on the ground into their mouths. It is how they figure out what objects are and how the world works. This is the perfect age to explore reading with touch and feel books. My First Touch and Feel Seasons book has bright, simple illustrations and labels all the pictures on the page. It is a great book for building vocabulary, not only through the unique words present, but also through the textures on the page. It is proof that simple books can have big impacts on our children. Babies and toddlers will love the simplicity of the book. It is perfect for a waiting room or in the car. Board books make it is for little fingers to hold and turn pages and with the sturdy construction it can double as a teething ring.

It is proof that simple books can have big impacts on our children

This book will build your child’s words about seasons, but also much much more. You can talk about the textures on the page. How does water feel? Is sand scratchy or smooth? Is the sun hot or cold? For infants, of course they won’t answer! But the back and forth, ask a question and pause for an answer, helps them understand how conversations work. You might even find that your baby will babble back an answer. As language develops they will be able to answer simple questions with simple answers. But by starting the habit at birth will help build towards better reading comprehension in the future.

There are also a lot of colors to explore on the page, patterns and shapes. And of course each season has its animals and clothing and foods. This is a great book in building readers but will also keep young learners engaged and participating.

HOW TO USE THIS BOOK:

It can be uncomfortable to read a book that doesn’t have a story. At this age, infants and toddlers are interested in anything you show them. As soon as they are done he will let you know by turning his head, if he is a baby, or finding his favorite toy, if he is a toddler. Point out what you see and don’t worry if the child wants to skip pages. Let them lead and relax.

This book can be read lots of different ways. Focus on textures with one reading or the objects on the page in another. You can also do a read through of just colors. Books don’t always have to be read the same way.

Make up a story about what happens during each of the seasons. Where is the child and what is he doing? What do you think will happen next. Older kids can help you with the story and, for infants, they just want to hear the sound of your voice.

Infants and Toddlers love to explore, so take them out of the house and explore whatever season you are in. Take a walk or play in a yard or go to the park. No matter where you end up talk about what you see. Point out the leaves, or if there are no leaves, say why. Talk about the animals or insects, the temperature, whether it is windy or hot or cold or whatever else you see and feel around you. Mention the Touch and Feel book and relate your experiences outside with what you read inside.

WHAT TO READ NEXT

 

Here are just a few of the many books in Deneux’s My first touch and feel series.

(I am an Amazon affiliate. Clicking on the picture will take you to Amazon where if you make any purchases I will receive a portion of the sale.)

 

What are your favorite touch and feel books? Comment on the post and share ideas!

 

Happy Reading!

Book Review: This Old Band by Tamera Will Wissinger

  • Ages Infant, Toddler, Preschool
  • Illustrated by Matt Loveridge
  • Skyhorse Publishing Inc, 2014

I love picture books you can sing a long to. Not only are they fun, singing is a great way for young children to hear sounds and how they are broken apart into syllables and singing also accentuates consonants and vowels in ways we don’t always get in reading.

But, if you are musically challenged, don’t worry! Reading the text is still a great way to help build these skills. The great thing about songs, read or sung, is the rhythmic text and the alliteration.

Phonological Awareness

This old band is sung to the tune, “This old man” It is a song most kids will recognize and join in with even if they don’t know the words they can hum along. I love the playful use of onomatopoeia and alliteration throughout the song. The pictures are fun and comic like. There are lots of different objects to talk about on the page. And after a few repeats your kids will be singing along.

Math Literacy

Another great part of this book is the math literacy it builds. Although I wish they used the actual numbers along with the written out number, counting backwards is a skill young preschoolers will find fun. And after the book is finished you can continue the conversation by grabbing sticks, or toys or whatever is at hand and using them to count 1-10 and then 10-1.

Narrative Skills

It is also great to help your child build narrative skills. Talk with your child about what instrument is played first. Maybe write it out on paper, cut them out and help your child organize as you read through the book again.

After all when we talk about literacy we aren’t just talking about words.

This is a great book to pick up when you are short on reading time. It has the vocabulary, the sounds, and the narrative skills we are looking for in a book.

Happy Reading or in this case Happy Singing!

 

Other fun books to sing with your child

(Reminder I am an amazon affiliate. When you click on a picture it takes you to amazon, where if you make a purchase, I get a portion of the sale. I do not get paid to promote any particular book. The views and opinions are mine and mine alone.)

 

Book Review: Too Princessy! By Jean Reidy

  • Infant, Toddler, Emerging Reader
  • Illustrated by Genevieve Leloup
  • Bloomsbury Books for Young Readers

 

Board books aren’t just for babies! The sturdy pages and simple illustrations and text make this a perfect book for kids on the go, toddler fingers and kids learning to sound out words on their own.

It is a fun book about a girls who can’t find anything to interest her on a rainy day. I’m sure our kids can all relate. Everything seems not quite what the girl is looking for until the end of the book where she finds something that is just right.

I like this book for its Vocabulary and Rhythmic text. Not only will your child hear new words he will also hear the sounds through the use of rhyming (last syllables sound the same), alliteration (the words begin with the same sound), and assonance (begin with different consonants but repeat the same vowel sound). It will help him become a discerning listener and reader.

The only problem I have with this book is how princessy it looks. It is a great book but may turn off readers for its pink cover. I almost wish it had Too Marsy instead of the girl with the crown on front.

Regardless of the book cover this is a great book for infants, because it is short; toddlers, because it is sturdy enough to withstand their sticky fingers; and emerging readers because the text is simple and the pictures support the words on the page.

This is a great book to highlight the point, all good books grow with us.

 

Happy Reading!

(Reminder: I am an Amazon Affiliate. When you click on a picture you are redirected to Amazon, where if you make a purchase, I receive a portion of the sale. I am not paid to review specific books. The opinions on the books are mine and mine alone.)

Find Others in the TOO! Series:

 

And other great books by the author:

Book Review: Big Bear, little chair By Lizi Boyd

Ages 2-5 (only because it is in hardcover not board book. Infants will enjoy the colors and pictures but will have more difficulty holding the book and turning pages on their own.)

Big Bear Little Chair is a beautifully illustrated book of opposites. It repeats the words throughout the story and links them all together at the end.

This is a great book for teaching VOCABULARY the author names a lot of objects and compares them to each other. The pictures are simple and beautifully drawn. Young children will be drawn to the black, white and red colors in the pictures inspiring PRINT MOTIVATION. LETTER KNOWLEDGE is also highlighted in the simple text that is easy to follow along. There is a little bit of rhyming but it isn’t present throughout the book. This book is perfect for very young ages but it is only in hardcover as of this review. It is the perfect color, text, and pictures for very young infants. Help you child handle the book

Skills Highlighted:

BigBearskills

 

Enhance the reading:

1. Look at the front page of the book with the child. Ask what she sees and what she thinks the book might be about.

2. Flip through the pages with the child without reading the text. Point out the pictures and name the object.

3. Point out the different parts of the book. The cover. The end papers (the pages on the inside of the cover that come before the title page. Next show the title page and name the author and let the child know the author also drew the pictures and wrote the story in this book. Continue through to the end of the book. Point out the author information on the dust jacket.

 

Take it further:

Go around the house and find objects of different sizes. Have the child compare the toys or household items and select which is bigger and which is smaller. Order them by size on the floor. You could also find similar items to the book.

Go for a walk and point out trees, light poles, cars, etc. Talk about the size of each. Play I spy with size. I spy with my little eye something taller than a bush but smaller than the light pole. Give clues and help the child guess what you are seeing.