Book Review: Billions of Bricks by Kurt Cyrus

billions-of-bricks

Billions of Bricks: A counting book about bricks. Kurt Cyrus. Henry Holt, New York, 2016.

WHAT I LOVE ABOUT THIS BOOK

Counting books are important aspect in building future readers. Literacy isn’t only about reading. A good foundation of counting and numbers from a young age helps each child get a strong start in school. What better way to prepare kids for future success in math than by reading together!

Billions of Bricks shows the different ways we count. We can count by twos, fives, tens, twenties and more. In this book, the author demonstrates counting through a construction site and the number of bricks it takes to build the structure and the end result of all those billions of bricks.

There is a lot of unique vocabulary in this book. (Arches, Pillars, Cellars) It also has a strong, fun rhyming text along with alliteration (Bricks and blocks abound. Build beneath the ground) Both of these techniques help build phonological awareness, which children need to develop before they begin to sound out words on their own. This isn’t a book that will build a strong narrative skill but children can develop reading comprehension by following the pictures on the page and describing what happens from start to end.

The pictures will help children identify shapes like cylinders, rectangles, squares and more. A good example of how pictures don’t just move a story along, they also are a helpful learning tool all on their own.

Kids at this age love to build, so it will tickle their natural curiosity on how buildings are put together and what keeps them from falling!

HOW TO USE THIS BOOK

Bricks might be hard to find, so go on a walk and find rocks. As you collect them, count them one by one. When you arrive home, you can show your child the different ways of counting. They don’t know it but they are learning to do basic addition and multiplication as they do this.

Use the rocks and separate into texture, shape, color. Organizing is a great way to build reading comprehension without opening a book. Organizing makes a child look at how to describe and understand the object. If you have a kitchen scale, weigh the rocks and note the numbers on the page next to each item. Then you can organize rocks from biggest to smallest. Heaviest to lightest. Sequencing is a great way to also build comprehension skills.

Go on a driving or walking tour and find different types of stone or building materials that make up buildings. Find houses, stores, sheds and more and highlight the construction portion of the book. It builds vocabulary and will interest your child in engineering.

There are so many ways to explore this book? Post your suggestions in the comments below?

WHAT TO READ NEXT

 

HAPPY READING!

Book Review: This Old Band by Tamera Will Wissinger

  • Ages Infant, Toddler, Preschool
  • Illustrated by Matt Loveridge
  • Skyhorse Publishing Inc, 2014

I love picture books you can sing a long to. Not only are they fun, singing is a great way for young children to hear sounds and how they are broken apart into syllables and singing also accentuates consonants and vowels in ways we don’t always get in reading.

But, if you are musically challenged, don’t worry! Reading the text is still a great way to help build these skills. The great thing about songs, read or sung, is the rhythmic text and the alliteration.

Phonological Awareness

This old band is sung to the tune, “This old man” It is a song most kids will recognize and join in with even if they don’t know the words they can hum along. I love the playful use of onomatopoeia and alliteration throughout the song. The pictures are fun and comic like. There are lots of different objects to talk about on the page. And after a few repeats your kids will be singing along.

Math Literacy

Another great part of this book is the math literacy it builds. Although I wish they used the actual numbers along with the written out number, counting backwards is a skill young preschoolers will find fun. And after the book is finished you can continue the conversation by grabbing sticks, or toys or whatever is at hand and using them to count 1-10 and then 10-1.

Narrative Skills

It is also great to help your child build narrative skills. Talk with your child about what instrument is played first. Maybe write it out on paper, cut them out and help your child organize as you read through the book again.

After all when we talk about literacy we aren’t just talking about words.

This is a great book to pick up when you are short on reading time. It has the vocabulary, the sounds, and the narrative skills we are looking for in a book.

Happy Reading or in this case Happy Singing!

 

Other fun books to sing with your child

(Reminder I am an amazon affiliate. When you click on a picture it takes you to amazon, where if you make a purchase, I get a portion of the sale. I do not get paid to promote any particular book. The views and opinions are mine and mine alone.)