Helping Parents Build Literacy at Home

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  • Do you find the day over before you’ve had time to read with your child?

  • Can’t find high quality books that your children will enjoy?

  • Do you want to build a better relationship with your child?

  • Do you want to find efficient and effective ways to build literacy in your home?

Building Future Readers Helps Busy Parents

Make Building Future Readers your go to source for book reviews, literacy building activities, reading research and author interviews.

Life gets busy fast and research shows reading 20 minutes a day creates curious, elastic, and adventurous minds. Not only do our children learn while we read, but the parent-child relationship strengthens and grows through the enriching conversations created with engaging books and play.

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How can Building Future Readers help?

  1. Reviews of Upcoming Picture Books. Each review focuses on the 6 early literacy skills: Print Motivation, Print Awareness, Vocabulary, Letter Awareness, Phonological Awareness, and Narrative Skills. In each review there is a section about the book, the skills highlighted, songs and activities that will continue learning after the last page, and suggestions of what to read next.
  2. Author interviews. Book excitement builds when a child learns about the women and men behind the books they enjoy.
  3. Reading Research. Our understanding of how kids learn to read and what works and doesn’t work as well changes constantly. Keep on top of the latest trends and topics.
  4. Reading Best Practices. Reading aloud isn’t intuitive! We all struggle with pronunciations and long winded passages at times. Find tips and tricks to get through books you didn’t realize you needed an English degree to conquer.
  5. Kids Who Play are Kids Who Read. Life gets out of control fast. Practices, lessons, get-togethers, playdates and so much more interfere with the time our kids need to play and explore. Learn about how to incorporate play and exploration into all aspects of your child’s day.

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Building Future Readers Helps Strengthen Families

Building Future Readers helps concerned parents find ways to impact the reading life of their child. The world changes fast and we will help you navigate the complexities.

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Building Future Readers helps parents find information about reading, reviews and research in one place.

For more reviews, tips, advice and more follow Building Future Readers Blog or like us on Facebook!4 daily Activities

10 Ways to Ruin Reading for Your Kids

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  1. Make them sit while you share a story. Kids bodies are meant to move and even if it doesn’t look like they are listening, they hear and are learning. Toddlers are more apt to run around, but keep reading.
  2. Keep books where they can’t reach them. One of Raganathan’s Five Rules of Library Science is books are for use. If kids can’t reach the books, they can’t use them! Have books on low shelves, baskets around the house, in the car and anywhere else they fit. And don’t worry if the books are destroyed. It doesn’t mean the kids aren’t ready for them, but that the books are well loved.
  3. Use books as punishment. Please, promise me right now, you will never use reading as a punishment. We want kids to associate reading with positive thoughts and memories, but if you use reading as a way to punish, they will hate reading.
  4. Read books like it is a punishment for you. We all have books that elicit a groan from our lips as soon as we see our child pick it off the shelf. It has no plot, it is longer than a George RR Martin book, or the stereotypes make you cringe. Still read the book like it is the most exciting piece of literature you ever read. Change the speed of your reading. Use lots of expressions and voices. Make it as fun to listen to as their favorite T.V. show.

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  1. Tell them to read while you watch T.V. or scroll through your phone. Our kids copy what we do, so if we want to build readers we need to be readers. And this means a physical book. Our kids can’t tell if we are using an e-reader app on a phone or tablet. Pick up a book and read.
  2. Reward your kids for reading. I am not a huge fan of Summer Reading Clubs and I get that it is a controversial statement. The intent is wonderful, but reward based behavior usually backfires and makes kids relate reading to something they have to be forced to do. Make reading a routine and skip the rewards.
  3. Don’t leave time in the day to read together. Many kids, even at a preschool age, are overscheduled. We don’t want them to fall behind in sports, music or technology, but think nothing of putting off reading time for another day. Reading should be a non-negotiable. Not only will it encourage a love of reading, it gives you and your family uninterrupted time together.
  4. Choose all the books for them. Did you like your summer reading list from school? Take your family to the library or bookstore and let them pick books. Slip in a couple of classics they might not choose on their own, but let them drive the selection and they will be excited to read.
  5. Don’t give them a place to read. Make reading special. Make sure there is a special spot for reading. It doesn’t take much. A couple of pillows, a blanket and a basket of books. You can get creative if you have the time or desire. Tents, blanket forts are all great places to snuggle up and read.
  6. Focus on the results not act itself. Don’t make story time together learning time. It will happen all on its own through the book choices and the discussions you have as you share the time together. The more books kids hear from the earliest age, the better they will do in school. It will happen. Don’t force it.

No substitute for books

 

What do you believe helps create kids who love to read? Share ideas in the comments.

Happy Reading

 

What Makes a Reader?

On my Facebook feed yesterday, there was a link to an article on a new study published by the journal Developmental Psychology. The study found that children who find reading success use something called “inventive spelling” as she writes. Find a link to the full article here.

WHAT IS INVENTIVE SPELLING?

Inventive spelling is how a child writes the words he hears. Children use the sounds they here to create the words on the page. I often see this in my own children’s writing work when they create stories. School will often be written as skul or skl. As the child matures, according to the study, the consonant and vowel sounds develop.

In the Children’s House in the Montessori classroom, this type of invented spelling is encouraged through the work, the moveable alphabet. The children use wooden letters and place them on a large mat, lined like a piece of paper. Children start by placing the letters on the mat, writing single words. Then stories. After the letters are placed on the mat, they will copy what they see onto a piece of paper and illustrate the story. Reinforcing hand strength, reading comprehension and phonological awareness.

The large takeaway from this study is memorizing sight words does not lead to reading success. The exploration of reading and words by the child and child directed, however does.

How to encourage “invented spelling”

  1. Have a lot of writing material available. No matter where you are, it is easy to carry a small notebook and pencil with you. In the car, waiting in line at the grocery store, or waiting for your child’s turn at the doctor’s office, have a notebook and pencil at the ready. Have her write down what she sees or a story about what will happen.
  2. Chalkboards work too. Chalkboards are great for many reasons. But I like the versatility of them. Children can use chalk, or even their fingers to form letters and words in the dust.
  3. Foam letters. Even if your child hasn’t mastered writing, he can use foam letters to form words and stories.
  4. Don’t worry about correcting or editing the words. At this stage your child is learning how words are put together and they sounds he hears. All of this leads to developing the skills he needs to become a future reader. Spelling comes later!

Take a look at the article. There are a lot of great tips on how to further encourage and build your child’s love for reading!