2017: Building Lifelong Reading Habits

 

This week we have written about three habits you can start now with yourself and your family in order to build reading habits for the lifetime of your children.

Read Every Day

The most important is to read every day. Twenty minutes is the recommendation but don’t let the number keep you from building the habit. Any amount of time spent in reading is helpful in future literacy success.

Know what good quality books to read

6prereadingskillsKnowing what books to read also helps build successful reading habits. Balance what your child loves to learn about with good quality picture books that highlight the six pre-literacy skills. The content will motivate her to hear the story and while she listens important literacy building blocks happen.

 

 

Be a reader to raise a reader

Lastly, be a reader. Our kids watch everything we do and love mimicking our actions. Make one of those parroting activities be reading. Read while you wait for appointments, read while your child plays independently or make a space for independent reading every night for your family. Make sure your child catches you reading everyday.

Start with these three habits and see how your child’s reading explodes over the course of the year.

 

Reading aloud

 

Thanksgiving Books for a long weekend with family

Long car trips, over-tired kids, and too many days off school? Here is a list of books to help you have fun and spend time together this holiday weekend. Don’t forget to add to the fun by making your own Thanksgiving poems, going on a Thanksgiving scavenger hunt or making your own Thanksgiving story, complete with pictures to help celebrate time together and build future readers!

Happy Thanksgiving and Happy Reading!

Kids fighting in the car? Pull out this Thanksgiving book by Dav Pilkey. It will have them laughing in their seats.

Younger child keeps eating his siblings book? This lift the flap board book has simple, bright pictures that will keep little hands engaged but is safe to chew on.

Political Talk at the table have you down? Pull out this book and share with all your relatives to help remind everyone how gratitude changes attitude.

Are the kids missing school? This is a fun book with silly pictures that will teach your kids to count backwards instead.

Feeling bad for all the Turkeys that didn’t receive a pardon this Thanksgiving? You and your child can cheer for this turkey to have a happy ending to its thanksgiving.

Need a book with big vocabulary to impress your in-laws? Karma Wilson always has beautiful rhyming text and big big words sure to impress.

 

Want a Thanksgiving book that teaches? Gail Gibbons always has beautifully illustrated and thoughtful books. A great way to end an evening.

Book Review: This Old Band by Tamera Will Wissinger

  • Ages Infant, Toddler, Preschool
  • Illustrated by Matt Loveridge
  • Skyhorse Publishing Inc, 2014

I love picture books you can sing a long to. Not only are they fun, singing is a great way for young children to hear sounds and how they are broken apart into syllables and singing also accentuates consonants and vowels in ways we don’t always get in reading.

But, if you are musically challenged, don’t worry! Reading the text is still a great way to help build these skills. The great thing about songs, read or sung, is the rhythmic text and the alliteration.

Phonological Awareness

This old band is sung to the tune, “This old man” It is a song most kids will recognize and join in with even if they don’t know the words they can hum along. I love the playful use of onomatopoeia and alliteration throughout the song. The pictures are fun and comic like. There are lots of different objects to talk about on the page. And after a few repeats your kids will be singing along.

Math Literacy

Another great part of this book is the math literacy it builds. Although I wish they used the actual numbers along with the written out number, counting backwards is a skill young preschoolers will find fun. And after the book is finished you can continue the conversation by grabbing sticks, or toys or whatever is at hand and using them to count 1-10 and then 10-1.

Narrative Skills

It is also great to help your child build narrative skills. Talk with your child about what instrument is played first. Maybe write it out on paper, cut them out and help your child organize as you read through the book again.

After all when we talk about literacy we aren’t just talking about words.

This is a great book to pick up when you are short on reading time. It has the vocabulary, the sounds, and the narrative skills we are looking for in a book.

Happy Reading or in this case Happy Singing!

 

Other fun books to sing with your child

(Reminder I am an amazon affiliate. When you click on a picture it takes you to amazon, where if you make a purchase, I get a portion of the sale. I do not get paid to promote any particular book. The views and opinions are mine and mine alone.)

 

Book Review: Return by Aaron Becker

There is no better gift to give a child than being able to tell their own story. It helps build imagination, it helps build narrative skills and believe it or not it helps build reading comprehension. Reading comprehension is a skill kids build the more they read and understand what is happening not only on the page but what might not be explicitly said in the words. There are a lot of great picture books out there that can help spark your child’s creative side but I believe an untapped and underutilized resource is wordless picture books.

The Journey series by Aaron Becker is a great example of hardworking wordless picture books. I happened to stumble upon the second book of his series not knowing that it was part of a trilogy. The great part about this book is it is great enjoyed as the whole trilogy but you and your child can still enjoy its wonderful illustrations and story as a stand alone book.

Sometimes parents are intimidated by wordless picture books. They feel like they can’t create a compelling story that will captivate their child. What I have discovered is start small. Just talk about what you see on the page. Or ask your child what they think is happening in the story. Or you start the story and have your child say what happens next and you can go back and forth until the last page. They great thing about the wordless picture book is there is no right or wrong. You and your child are the storytellers. It may be one story one day and a different story the next. It’s a great way to show your young child that stories have so many possibilities. It will unlock the wordsmith inside and help them dive into a new world.

The other great thing about wordless picture books is they work for any age. You can talk about what is on the page with babies, develop a short sentence description for toddlers and let your preschooler fill in the story. The books grow easily with the child and can even be used with independent readers as a story start.

 

Do yourself a favor and pick up this great trilogy by Aaron Becker. Explore a fantastic kingdom and find unique ways to act out the story long after the last page is read.

Happy Reading!

 

What are some of your favorite wordless picture books?

(I am an amazon affiliate. By clicking on the picture you will be redirected to Amazon, where if you make a purchase I receive a percentage of sales. I do not get paid to review or recommend books. My opinions are mine and mine alone)

Explore more wordless picture books: