Book Review: Stanley’s Store by Williambee

Stanley's storeStanley’s Store by Williambee, Peachtree: Atlanta, 2017.

Stanley owns a store and customers come to find what is on their grocery list. This is part of a series of books about Stanley and his friends.

What I like about this book

Stanley’s store is a bright and cheerful vocabulary book that will familiarize kids with products they might find at a grocery store. They will identify with Little Woo who loves to shop and grab all the sweets within his reach. Not only are many of the items found in the store labeled, the author also makes sure to include colors and shapes and textures as well.

The different characters and what they buy at the store also provides a structure to the story that will help build narrative skills. This book provides a lot of opportunities to ask questions. Here are a few to get you started:

  • Who bought the cheese? And what problem did it cause?
  • How would you solve Myrtle’s problem when she buys all of her cheese?
  • Who are you in the story? Little Woo? Hattie? Myrtle? Stanley?
  • What would you buy at the store?

How to use this book

After reading this book take a trip to the grocery store. See if you can find a small independent store that you haven’t been to. If available, find an Asian or Indian or other diverse ethnic grocery store to explore. Inside, locate the different departments and name what you and your child see. Talk about the shapes and the colors and the textures of the packages and foods.

Create a story about Stanley and what your child thinks Stanley will do after work. Write down the story your child tells and have her illustrate the pages.

 

What to read next:

William Bee is a prolific writer of children’s books. Here are just a few examples of his other books. (I am an Amazon Affiliate. I am not paid for my review, but if you click on the pictures, you will be directed to Amazon, where if you make a purchase, I do receive a small percentage.)

 

Do you have a favorite Stanley or William Bee book? Comment in the post below.

Happy Reading!!

A Storytime Primer for Parents

When I worked as a children’s librarian, my favorite part of the week was planning storytimes for a local Head Start school. I would sit on the floor of the children’s area and sift through the shelves looking for a theme and fun books to complement it.

But I didn’t stop there, because the theme was only to get the kids interested in the books, the real learning was happening through the choices I made about the books I read.

So how does a librarian plan a story time?

It starts with a theme. Themes can be about a topic like moving or first day of school or beach days. It could be colors or shapes. I once had a teacher ask me to do a storytime on positional words like Over, Under, Above, Below. That was a challenging storytime to prepare.

Once I have chosen a theme, I start to assemble books. Story times and attention spans of preschool children usually last about 30 minutes. Three or four books, with songs and rhymes in-between will fill the time quickly. So with so few minutes, how did I make the most of the stories I read?

Focus on the Six Pre-Literacy Skills

With all the choices of books out there and so little time, after I settled on a theme, I chose what of the six skills I would highlight that week.6prereadingskills

This part is for the kids, but they will never know it. These six skills are the building blocks for future reading success. When I introduce the book, I will say a line about the skill highlighted in the book and a quick sentence about why it is important. That is for the teachers and the parents and the caregivers. The kids only need to know they are in for a great book.

After the theme and books are chosen, I then choose the order I read the books in.

When reading to kids, order matters

With active bodies and imaginations, storytimes need to be kept short. I always start the storytime with the longest book. If you try to read the Little Engine Who Could at the end of a story session you will have chaos on your hands. So start with the longest book first and end with the shortest.

After the order is chosen, find songs and rhymes to go along with them.

This is a great way to get the kids wiggles out

Kids are made to move. Sitting and listening to story after story is hard. So make the most of your time and take short breaks to get those little bodies moving. Fingerplays are a great way to involve the kids in the story time and get their attention back. (Fingerplays are poems/songs like where is thumbkin) Playing music and having them follow your dance is also a great way to get them back in a listening mood. Sing a song, repeat nursery rhymes, whatever you can dream up for a quick break between books will be appreciated by the young listeners.

Those are the building blocks of a story time, so let’s see the theory in practice.

Preschool Story Time Sampler

 

The theme as you can tell is messes! These books I chose because of the unique vocabulary, the strong narratives, rhyming words, and the fun pictures that build print motivation. The last book, I ain’t gonna paint no more is a show stopper because it can be sung to It Ain’t gonna rain no more.  All of the books encourage interaction with the kids and fun conversations. Songs that could be used with this storytime are Laurie Bernker’s Victor Vito, The Itsy Bitsy Spider, and the nursery rhyme humpty dumpty. I always began and ended my storytimes with the same opening rhyme and the same ending rhyme. It gives the kids a sense of order and completion to their time at the library.

Now, I am not suggesting that parents create a show-stopping storytime for their loved ones each night, but it may help you break through a reading rut with your child or find a new way to explore stories together.

VOCABULARY

 

 

PRINT MOTIVATION

 

NARRATIVE SKILLS

 

 

 

PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS

 

 

 

(I am an amazon affiliate member, if you click on a picture it takes you to Amazon, where if you make a purchase I get a small percentage of the proceeds. I am not paid to review any particular books and the opinions are all mine.)

Websites for Parents to help build literacy

Best Literacy

These are five websites I turn to for up-to-date literacy news and book lists. Follow many of these on social media or visit the links by clicking below.

Growing Book by Book Started by an early childhood teacher and literary specialist, Growing Book by Book is a great website that has reading tips and read aloud ideas for infants to early readers. Here you will find activities to use with your child and book ideas to keep your reading routine fun and interesting. Growing Book by Book also has an active Facebook page that shares relevant reading articles and blog posts from other sites and great reading lists.

 

The Literacy Nest An educator and mom who is also trained to help kids with dyslexia.  Although the website is geared towards older children, I find she shares great resources on literacy and how to engage struggling or reluctant readers. All children learn to read at their own rate and in their own way and this site is a great resource for all parents.

 

Reading Rockets An organization for parents, teachers, and other dedicated literacy staff. Book lists, activities, articles and more on helping families and teachers build a culture of readers.

 

Raising Readers Is a website about a program for Maine families but the resources on the site about reading and the importance of early literacy can be used by anyone. While you won’t be able to receive any of the books, there are great book lists and articles to peruse to help build your future reader.

 

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library Dolly Parton is committed to providing access to books for children and families across the country. From birth to age five a child will receive a book a month in participating communities. If there isn’t a program in your community you can start one! Imagine receiving a free book every month for your child. They will have 60 books by the time they reach age 5.

 

What websites do you turn to for your reading and literacy questions?

Happy Reading!!

May’s Preschool Reading List

No substitute for booksHeading to the library and don’t know what to look for?

Below is a printable PDF that you can take to the library with you. These books are books that my own children devoured or were huge hits at the library storytimes. Also included are music cd’s and magazines that will build literacy while having fun together. Each book listed will have the pre-literacy skills that are strongest in the book. Take this list with you to discover new books together.

This week’s list is for preschoolers. Next week look for board books and picture books for toddlers and the last week of May will be board books for babies.

Enjoy the list and feel free to share with the other parents you know.

Preschool take me to the library reading list

 

Happy Reading!!

Celebrate Great Children’s Literature during Children’s Book Week

CBW-champion-FINALA librarian for the Boy Scouts for America toured the US in order to raise awareness and support for better quality children’s books. He wanted to create a “Good Book Week” to celebrate children’s literature and he enlisted the help of Publisher’s Weekly, the American Library Association and the American Booksellers Association to join the Boy Scouts in promoting this event.

In 1944, the Children’s Book Council took over the event and it is still held today, 98 years after the first event. (see Every Child a Reader for more on the history of the event)

High quality children’s books are critical in building the success of future readers. What can you do as parents or caregivers to build a love of reading for the children you care for.

  1. Make reading a regular routine. Just like brushing teeth, reading should be a part of your child’s every day. It only takes twenty minutes to build a love of reading and the necessary pre-literacy skills that will aid your child during his school years.
  2. Find books your children love. Read blogs, check out the new shelf of your library, go to the bookstore and ask friends. There are a lot of places to find new and enriching books.
  3. Put books within your child’s reach. No high bookshelves! Have baskets in multiple rooms of the house with easy access to books. Keep a bag handy in the car with books and always keep a book or two with you while you wait for appointments. Make finding a book as easy as finding her favorite toy.
  4. Go to a bookstore or library storytime as a family. Show your child the importance of reading by attending a community storytime. Here you will learn about new books and learn new songs to sing together.
  5. To raise a reader be  a reader. Let your child catch you reading throughout the day. Our kids tend to copy our habits. Look how early they imitate our smartphone habits! So, pick up a book and get reading, and know that your love of reading will grow your child’s love of it too!

Don’t forget to look at the events page at your local library, bookstore and school to see the exciting events taking place in your community for Children’s Book Week.

For further information about this week and ways to celebrate

  • Get started on your summer reading with this Summer 2017 list by Publisher’s Weekly.
  • Find out more about Children’s Book Week here.
  • Search for your local events here.
  • Find downloadable books and activities from a CBW sponsor here.

You can also vote in the Children and Teen’s Book Choice awards by clicking here.

Tell us in the comments how you are celebrating with your child this week!

HAPPY READING!

What Makes a Reader?

On my Facebook feed yesterday, there was a link to an article on a new study published by the journal Developmental Psychology. The study found that children who find reading success use something called “inventive spelling” as she writes. Find a link to the full article here.

WHAT IS INVENTIVE SPELLING?

Inventive spelling is how a child writes the words he hears. Children use the sounds they here to create the words on the page. I often see this in my own children’s writing work when they create stories. School will often be written as skul or skl. As the child matures, according to the study, the consonant and vowel sounds develop.

In the Children’s House in the Montessori classroom, this type of invented spelling is encouraged through the work, the moveable alphabet. The children use wooden letters and place them on a large mat, lined like a piece of paper. Children start by placing the letters on the mat, writing single words. Then stories. After the letters are placed on the mat, they will copy what they see onto a piece of paper and illustrate the story. Reinforcing hand strength, reading comprehension and phonological awareness.

The large takeaway from this study is memorizing sight words does not lead to reading success. The exploration of reading and words by the child and child directed, however does.

How to encourage “invented spelling”

  1. Have a lot of writing material available. No matter where you are, it is easy to carry a small notebook and pencil with you. In the car, waiting in line at the grocery store, or waiting for your child’s turn at the doctor’s office, have a notebook and pencil at the ready. Have her write down what she sees or a story about what will happen.
  2. Chalkboards work too. Chalkboards are great for many reasons. But I like the versatility of them. Children can use chalk, or even their fingers to form letters and words in the dust.
  3. Foam letters. Even if your child hasn’t mastered writing, he can use foam letters to form words and stories.
  4. Don’t worry about correcting or editing the words. At this stage your child is learning how words are put together and they sounds he hears. All of this leads to developing the skills he needs to become a future reader. Spelling comes later!

Take a look at the article. There are a lot of great tips on how to further encourage and build your child’s love for reading!

 

 

Book Review: Shapes, Reshape! Silvia Borando

  • Toddler, Preschool
  • Shapes, Reshape! Silvia Borando. Candlewick Press: Somerville, 2014.

Shapes, Reshape! Is a counting and guessing book that keeps your child’s imagination on the move.

WHAT I LOVE ABOUT THIS BOOK

When we talk about literacy we often only think about reading, but math literacy is just as critical at the earliest stages of life. It is hard to find books that do more than counting to improve spatial reasoning and visualization that children will need later in their math careers. This book not only provides sequencing through counting, but spatial reasoning through the shapes that make up the pictures. Seeing how the shapes fit together and how they are reorganized to create a different shape is a great skill to have not only in school but in life.

This book will introduce your child to shapes or reinforce the shapes they already know, all while building vocabulary. There is also great words like buzzy and dragonflies. Flittering and fluttering. Which not only will teach her new words, but also encourage phonological awareness through the use of alliteration.

The sequencing in the book is phenomenal. The numbers provide one way to tell the story. The child will practice counting backwards through the numbers in the story. Next, your son will love guessing how to reorganize the shapes into the next animal. It will have them giggling and guessing all the way through the pages. With each retelling they will strengthen narrative skills by ordering the animals through the book.

Print Motivation is high with this book. My 6, 8 and 12 year old all stopped what they were doing and came over to sit with me when I picked up this book off the shelf.

Print Awareness is also highlighted by how the text is read and the story progresses. This is a great book to use your finger and follow along to point out the words on the page. The text isn’t so long that your child will lose interest and he will see how a story is told.

How To Use This Book

This book begs to be recreated with your own shapes and numbers. You can draw pictures with crayons or if you are more ambitious, trace shapes and have your child cut them out. Then spend a fun afternoon organizing and reorganizing to see what different objects you can create together. Label or make a list every time you make a new shape to help reinforce vocabulary and writing!

Organize the animals into a list. This is a great way to take sequencing to the next level and build vocabulary. It can be however you want, where the animal lives, if it has a tail, stripes, or whatever else you can think of. Write the names with corresponding numbers and you will do a double whammy with math and reading literacy.

I always love connecting what our children read to the real world, so take a trip to the zoo and see what animals you can find. And for dragons, well, what better place than your local library to find different stories and myths of these large-fire-breathing-creatures.

What to Read Next

Other books by the author

Or Similar books: