Book Review: Poppy and Sam and the Leaf Thief by Cathon

I am an Amazon Affiliate, which means if you click on links or pictures it will direct you to Amazon, where if you make a purchase I receive a percentage of the sale. I am not paid to review books. I did receive access to the book from NetGalley.

Poppy and Sam and the Leaf Thief by Cathon. OwlKids books, Published 8/15/2018.

Talk

 Comics and graphic novels are the perfect stepping stone to build enthusiastic readers.

My kids love graphic novels. I gave up a long time ago asking them to read my favorite chapter books. The quality of comic books and graphic novels has really improved and more and more I find myself suggesting graphic novels to parents.

The problem is, there is a bias against these types of publications. While in the past, they were not always of the best quality, the market has certainly changed. For new or emerging readers the simple text and picture driven story provide a solid foundation for reading comprehension. If you have a hesitant reader, comics and graphic novels are the perfect stepping stone to build enthusiastic readers.

Meet Poppy and Sam

Poppy and Sam, through trial and error, discover the mystery of who has been eating Basil’s leaves. The comic/graphic novel illustrations keep the narrative clear showing children the sequence of events from beginning to end without a lot of extras to confuse the narrative. The language is rich and unique and repetitive in all the right places to help children learn new vocabulary. This book is not only great for independent readers who love comic books, but it serves as a great read aloud to preschoolers. The themes of friendship, community, manners along with the mystery element will keep readers engaged through the pages.

Million Dollar Words

  • culprit
  • interviewing
  • nibbled
  • lurking
  • aphids
  • shifty
  • tunnel
  • dense
  • earwig

How do you help your kids learn these new vocabulary words without making it boring?

Play Charades

Play charades! Grab a bag and write the words on slips of paper and toss them in the bag. Have your child chose a paper. Read the word to them, making sure to run your finger underneath as you read it to encourage print and letter awareness. Then, talk about what the word means and choose an action to represent it. Have your child repeat the motion/action and choose another. After you have gone through the words a few times together, see if they can perform the action on their own when you read the word.

Go on a word scavenger hunt

This one will be tricky and requires imagination but see if you can find books or objects that the child can experience each word out of context of the book. Dig through dirt and see if you can find any earwigs. Look for books on aphids and ladybugs. Give an impromptu science lesson by finding objects that are dense, versus objects that are hollow. There is no right or wrong!

Sing

Singing promotes literacy because it breaks down the sounds of words. The phonemes the children hear provide a solid basis for future reading. Play music in the car as you drive around town, put on music during the 4 o’clock witching hour and have your kids dance their energy out and during baths or getting ready for daycare or preschool, sing songs to keep everyone’s mood light and squeeze in more learning time for your child.

Fingerplays are another great way to get kids involved in the action. There are alot of great options on the internet or create your own using nursery rhymes your child already knows.

Play

Recently, I read a great article about how movement, especially crossing the midline, is essential to building reading comprehension. I know it sounds weird, but readers are built by playing!

How Crossing the Midline Activities Helped this Child Listen to His Teacher retrieved from Integrated Learning Strategies Learning Corner on 10/11/18.

So whenever you are listening to music, or find yourself waiting, have your child practice some of these moves to help integrate their whole body.

Cook with Basil

Make Spaghetti Sauce! Cooking or baking are great ways to practice reading, numbers, math and all sorts of goodness. Go to the store and by fresh basil and pretend earwig is nibbling on the plant. Tear up the leaves and prepare your favorite sauce recipe. Have your child taste the basil as you cook.

Mystery Bag

Fill a gift bag, grocery bag, or whatever you have lying around with different objects. Have your child pretend to be Poppy or Sam and solve the mystery of what’s in the bag. Have them close their eyes and feel the object and make a guess to what it is. You might need to show this a few times to them before giving them a turn. Any old household item will do, not only does it increase vocabulary, it gets their senses involved!

Read

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