Helping Parents Build Literacy at Home

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  • Do you find the day over before you’ve had time to read with your child?

  • Can’t find high quality books that your children will enjoy?

  • Do you want to build a better relationship with your child?

  • Do you want to find efficient and effective ways to build literacy in your home?

Building Future Readers Helps Busy Parents

Make Building Future Readers your go to source for book reviews, literacy building activities, reading research and author interviews.

Life gets busy fast and research shows reading 20 minutes a day creates curious, elastic, and adventurous minds. Not only do our children learn while we read, but the parent-child relationship strengthens and grows through the enriching conversations created with engaging books and play.

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How can Building Future Readers help?

  1. Reviews of Upcoming Picture Books. Each review focuses on the 6 early literacy skills: Print Motivation, Print Awareness, Vocabulary, Letter Awareness, Phonological Awareness, and Narrative Skills. In each review there is a section about the book, the skills highlighted, songs and activities that will continue learning after the last page, and suggestions of what to read next.
  2. Author interviews. Book excitement builds when a child learns about the women and men behind the books they enjoy.
  3. Reading Research. Our understanding of how kids learn to read and what works and doesn’t work as well changes constantly. Keep on top of the latest trends and topics.
  4. Reading Best Practices. Reading aloud isn’t intuitive! We all struggle with pronunciations and long winded passages at times. Find tips and tricks to get through books you didn’t realize you needed an English degree to conquer.
  5. Kids Who Play are Kids Who Read. Life gets out of control fast. Practices, lessons, get-togethers, playdates and so much more interfere with the time our kids need to play and explore. Learn about how to incorporate play and exploration into all aspects of your child’s day.

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Building Future Readers Helps Strengthen Families

Building Future Readers helps concerned parents find ways to impact the reading life of their child. The world changes fast and we will help you navigate the complexities.

Story Questions

Building Future Readers helps parents find information about reading, reviews and research in one place.

For more reviews, tips, advice and more follow Building Future Readers Blog or like us on Facebook!4 daily Activities

Book Review: Am I Yours? by Alex Latimer

All children get lost at some point in early childhood. It is a frightening event and with all the talk of stranger danger, kids are even more afraid than ever. This is a rhythmical story about an unlucky egg that gets blown out of its nest and tries to find its way home. Reminiscent of PD Eastman’s Are You My Mother? It is a perfect story to read to help allay your child’s fears of getting lost and a good conversation starter about what to do when you can’t find a familiar face.

 

(I received a free advance reader copy of this book from the publisher. I was not paid for my review. The opinions expressed are mine. I am an Amazon Affiliate and if you click on a picture it will take you to Amazon where if you make a purchase I receive a portion of the sale.)

 

Build Comprehension

Book Talk Cover Story

Build Vocabulary

I have to admit Dinosaur books always worried me a little. Kids love the books, but I can’t always pronounce their names on the first try! We know that fluidity matters, but this is a great opportunity for you to show your child how to approach new words. Sounding them out, will not only help them hear each of the individual sounds that make up the word, it will also demonstrate how to work through new words.

Am I yoursmillionwords

Build Conversation

It will happen. Even the most attentive parents and kids will get separated at some point. At the park, the store, the pool it is an inevitable part of life. Talking about what to do when your child is lost is important, and it needs to be done in a way that won’t scare them. There are a lot of resources out there and every family, parent and child is different, so find what works for you and your child and then talk about it. This isn’t only for their own safety, but talking about life skills is a good way to have a positive and meaningful discussion with even the youngest of children.

5 Things your kids need to know about getting lost

What should your child do if she gets lost

Help, I’m lost! How to teach your child what to do if he’s lost

In addition, it helps our kids to think about situations and how to respond before it happens. You can discuss the feelings he might have or the questions she might experience. All of this not only gives them information they need, but talking with our children helps build future readers!

Build Word Sounds

Songs are a great way to help your child learn word sounds. Singing builds phonological awareness which he will need as he learns to sound out words for reading.

My Address

Have Fun!

Reading shouldn’t stop when the book closes! Find ways to continue the story outside or around the house. Play isn’t only for fun, it is a time for learning as well!

Find different objects that are round. Apples, oranges, balls, eggs and see how each one rolls (or doesn’t roll so well) Have your child predict which when she thinks will roll the best. You can use a small hill or go to the park.

At craft stores like Jo-ann Fabrics or Michaels you are often able to find inexpensive plastic dinosaurs. Buy some for your child and as you are waiting at the doctors office or for school pick up for older siblings let your child’s imagination soar.

Feel like a kid again! Find a big hill and roll down with your child. Not only will the physical experience enrich your child’s play, play helps parents and children bond!

What to read next

Other books by Alex Latimer:

How do you talk about getting lost with your children?

Happy Reading

Book Review: Sir Simon, Super Scarer by Cale Atkinson

(I received a free copy from the publisher for review. I was not paid to write the review. All the opinions expressed in the post are mine and mine alone. In addition, I am an Amazon Affiliate, if you click on an image it will take you to Amazon, where if you make a purchase I receive a percentage of the sale.)

This book was published on September 4, 2018

In my fourteen years of parenting, I have checked a lot of closets, I have turned on a lot of nightlights, I have checked under beds and snuggled with my kids (and dogs!) during storms.

Fear of the unknown, make-believe or real, happens to all kids. A safe and reassuring way to help our kids work through normal fears is through reading. Children are able to visit the dark and look at the monsters and scary things all within the comfort and reassuring arms of their grown-ups.

Sir Simon, Super Scarer by Cale Atkinson is the perfect book to read with your child to help begin conversations about what scares them. Simon is a ghost, who wants to not work so hard and he is excited to learn the woman moving into the house he haunts is a “grandma.” Grandparents don’t take a lot of work and Simon can’t wait to get to work on all the hobbies he hasn’t had time form. It all goes awry when a little boy moves in as well and won’t leave Chester alone. Chester devises a plan that keeps the boy happy and Chester free until he realizes what he really needed was a friend.

Million Dollar Words Sir Simon

I was drawn to this book, not only for the unique language and the emotional intelligence it builds, but also the way it uses the illustrations to highlight the text. The text doesn’t only go from left to right, top to bottom. It will be on the stairs, or in the tree or in text bubbles. This allows for the reader to use their finger to point to the sentences which builds an awareness of the words that make up the story on the page.

The illustrations are simple but rich in color and do not overwhelm the reader. It would be a great book to tell by only using the pictures which helps the child learn to “read” through the story on their own.

Another reason this is a must read, is because your child has a lot of opportunities to participate in the storytelling. They can make the animal ghost sounds or find pots and pans or other household items to recreate the clomping, creaking and stomping sounds. Engaged listeners are engaged learners.

Sir Simon tackles a subject all kids deal with throughout their childhood: FEAR Simon is a relatable and unscary ghost who will provide an opportunity for our children to explore their feelings in a caring and controlled environment.

Find more about the Author/Illustrator Cale Atkinson here

 

Activities/Enrichment

Make your own silly ghost noises. Onomatopoeia is a great way to build the phonological awareness our kids need to build their reading skills. You can also build in some narrative skills by classifying sounds like Animal sounds, motor sounds, or letter sounds (like words that start with the k sound: creeping, clomping, crawling)

 

Ghost Sounds

 

What do you remember?Story Questions

Recall not only helps reading comprehension, but it also aids in a child’s understanding of how stories are built, what makes a good story and what they need to make their own story. After you have read the book a few times, ask your child what happens. Put it on different pieces of paper with enough space for them to draw/illustrate and then they can retell the story using the pieces of paper. They won’t remember ever single page, but by helping them remember how the story started, what the problem was and how the problem was solved, your child will be miles ahead when it comes time for them to do book reports and reviews in elementary school.

 

What to read next

Other Books about Monsters, Make-believe and Fear

Other Books by Cale Atkinson

Books for Grown-ups to Read

Understanding how to talk about feelings and emotions with our kids not only builds literacy it builds EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE. Emotional Intelligence benefits our kids not only during childhood but throughout life. Below are a list of suggestions of books that will be helpful in learning how to help your child discuss feelings and describe emotions.

 

What scary books do you share with your children?

 

 

Book Review: Pink is for Boys by Robb Pearlman

A few summers ago, my family and I vacationed at Disney World. My youngest was six and everywhere she went, the cast members called her princess. She readily told them she was not a princess but a JEDI!

Socialization and gender labeling happens before birth. Gender reveal parties, pink or blue announcements, and nurseries decorated in either pinks and purples or blues and reds. Our children are not born believing only girls wear dresses and only boys play football, those are stereotypes that are taught.

I know talking about gender identity is a scary topic for parents. You don’t want to invalidate or confuse your child. This book can be enjoyed with or without the deeper discussions. You know your child best and what I have discovered is to follow their lead.

Picture Book Stereotyping

Picture books often get involved in the gender stereotyping. Books for girls on the covers are often pastel, soft and gentle. “Boy books” are often about dirt, construction, and transportation. There is not only a diversity issue in the children’s book world, there is also a problem with the gender roles established in the very books that are building children’s understanding of the world.

My favorite book when I was a child was Nurse Nancy. Although I am sure I liked it because it came with its own bandaids. In the story Nurse Nancy wasn’t allowed to play with the boys until one of them got hurt and she was needed to care for them. The companion book Doctor Dan was a book about a boy pretending to be a doctor. If I hadn’t had different parents, I would have believed that only girls became nurses and boys became doctors, because even though it is 2018, it is a storyline still often told in the books for our youngest readers and listeners. It wasn’t until my first daughter was born and I found the beloved Nurse Nancy book at the bookstore I realized how inappropriate the message of the book was!

I am happy to see more and more books are not gender specific, the authors and publishers could go a lot further in breaking down the dangerous gender roles that plague the advancement of girls (and boys) in our country.

All of that being said, Pink is for Boys by Robb Pearlman and Illustrated by Eda Kaban is a great book for babies, toddlers and preschoolers. It has simple text for listeners as young as 6 months, but preschoolers will also enjoy diving deeper into the conversations in the illustrations.

In this book your children will learn about colors and they will see diversity in the children on the page. All listeners will find a familiar face on the page. The vocabulary in the text is strong but also by using the pictures on the page, parents will have a lot of opportunities to describe the pictures and find new words!

Examples

  • On the first page spread is a dance party. In it point out the objects the child might not know, or use another word to describe a familiar object. Use baby grand piano instead of piano. Talk about the bunting in the window and mention when and why we use it. Name different shapes you see in the balloons, clouds, bunting, walls, piano keys and more. One page of illustrations will provide plenty of enriching conversation!
  • This will also be a great opportunity for preschoolers especially, to ask questions that go beyond what the words and illustrations show. For example the second page spread is about blue is for girls and boys. It shows a girl and boy in baseball uniforms. You can discuss what sports there are and name some that are unusual like polo, la crosse or running. To gauge your child’s understanding of the book, you can ask who plays basketball or baseball or soccer. This book provides an opportunity to show our children that boys can do whatever girls do and girls can do whatever boys do!
  • Sometimes the simplest books pack the most educational punch for our kids. This book will keep the child engage, help them learn about colors and new words as well as help break the stereotype that boys and girls can like the same colors, clothes and games.

TALK: Million Dollar Words

Below are words that appear in the text or illustrations. Find ways to use these words in conversation. Another way to familiarize the child with the words are to point them out after reading the book, or stop and point out while reading.

  • Valance
  • Bunting
  • Catcher
  • Column
  • Chandelier
  • Track
  • Dribbling
  • Fragile
  • Cuddle

TALK: Build Reading Comprehension. Ask Questions!

Don’t only read the book. Ask questions! It helps build reading comprehension and it also builds enjoyment. Don’t know where to start? Begin with these and add your own. Even have your child ask YOU questions.

picturebookquestions

PLAY: Low Cost Enrichment

Read the book and then try some of the activities in the youtube video. Lots of great ways to help kids learn sorting, ordering and more. All which help increase reading comprehension. Included in this video are ideas on strengthening the pincer grip which helps children learn to write.

Sing

Try this song from Teaching Mama. It will help your child identify colors and label clothing and follow directions.

Retrieved from Teaching mama on September 3, 2018 at https://teachingmama.org/10-preschool-songs-colors/

PLAY

Learning isn’t only about reading and information. Our children need to play more than any other activity at this stage in life. Some ideas for independent play:

  • Create a dress up box. Include items from mens closets as well as women’s. Thrift stores are a great place to find gently used items.
  • If you have a back or front yard, take off your child’s shoes and socks and let them run around in bare feet. There is a lot of research that shows the link between no shoe childhoods and brain development. Read an article in the Washington Post here
  • Find a park or a safe space and let your child pedal on a bike, tricycle, or any other object that moves. They can pretend they are on the race track like the children in the book. Get a book out for yourself and watch the play.

What to read next

Julian plays dress up after spotting three beautiful women on the subway ride home. He makes a mess and is worried how his Abuela will feel when she sees what he’s done.

The colors fight and a big mess ensues. See how they solve their problems.

A blue crayon is labeled red and must find a way to follow its heart no matter what obstacles the crayon faces.

Annie is forced to wear a dress to a wedding and Annie hates dresses. See how she overcomes this dilemma.

Share in the comments different ways you find to include the Million Dollar words in your conversations.

Happy Reading